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Thread: Need help with Christmas puddings.

  1. #1

    Need help with Christmas puddings.

    hi guys.
    Christmas is the holly festival, celebrated in the every part of the world.
    in every region it is celebrated with the lots of cheers dance and mainly food.
    well i belong from India. and we guys celebrate this holly festival with lots of Indian sweet.
    But i would like to celebrate it this time with some western style food.
    can anyone suggest about how to make the Chinese puddings.
    as well as i want to know what kind of sweet dish do western countries make to enjoy this festival.
    Like as either in U.S. or either in U.K. which dishes are mainly made and prepared for the Christmas.
    i need help with this. Help me and suggest me solutions regarding this.
    Thank You. Bye for now.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    The Holiday Worlds of Old
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    2,189
    I'm not sure if this is exactly what you are looking for, but here is a site with a few pudding recipes on it:

    http://fashion-era.com/Christmas/chr...ing_recipe.htm

    Hope they help some!
    PumpkinJack81
    Bob, Forum Moderator
    AllThingsChristmas.com

  3. #3
    princieprakash - many people in the native range of Diospyros virginiana (common or American persimmon) make persimmon pudding instead of fig pudding. However, since asian persimmons have been grown in the US since 1850, many people use them for making persimmon pudding as well. You should be able to get asian persimmons in India.

    A friend of mine makes a traditional fig pudding with hard sauce. The traditional pudding is not favored by some because of all the beef suet/tallow. Also, those folks who don't like alcoholic beverages may object to the rum in the hard sauce.

    Around here, in addition to persimmon pudding, holiday fare includes pumpkin pies, pecan pies, sweet potato pies (or a mix of sweet potato and pumpkin), cranberry/orange relish (real relish but some folks like the cranberry goo in a can too), various cookies...gingerbreads are always a favorite, etc.

    This year I'm experimenting with a pawpaw pie. Here, pawpaw is Asimina triloba...but in tropical areas pawpaw may be used to refer to papayas (Carica papaya).

    I'll have to think about the rest. I'll get back to you.
    Last edited by persimmonpudding; 09-19-2008 at 09:46 PM.
    persimmonpudding.com: dedicated to growing, education, and use of Diospyros virginiana L., the common, or American persimmon...and persimmon pudding is ALWAYS a holiday favorite!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Back home again in Indiana
    Posts
    3,782
    Quote Originally Posted by princieprakash View Post
    hi guys.
    Christmas is the holly festival, celebrated in the every part of the world.
    in every region it is celebrated with the lots of cheers dance and mainly food.
    well i belong from India. and we guys celebrate this holly festival with lots of Indian sweet.
    But i would like to celebrate it this time with some western style food.
    can anyone suggest about how to make the Chinese puddings.
    as well as i want to know what kind of sweet dish do western countries make to enjoy this festival.
    Like as either in U.S. or either in U.K. which dishes are mainly made and prepared for the Christmas.
    i need help with this. Help me and suggest me solutions regarding this.
    Thank You. Bye for now.
    The traditional American Christmas dinner:

    Roast Turkey
    Mashed Potatoes
    Gravy
    Cranberry Sauce (Ocean Spray brand comes already made in a can)
    Green Beans or Green Peas
    Bread or Rolls
    Butter (for the bread and some people put it on their green beans or peas)
    Pies, Cake, or Sugar Cookies

    The pies might be pumpkin and mincemeat. Apple pie is always popular, but when we serve turkey our guests generally expect pumpkin pie. Many families bake a variety of pies. Some people like to put whipped cream on their pumpkin pie. A lot of people like warm apple pie served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.
    Last edited by Merry Christmas Darling; 09-19-2008 at 10:18 PM.

  5. #5
    I should have mentioned pawpaw pudding as well. The thing is, traditional basically stems greatly from what region you're from...and how many years it takes one to determine "tradition". For instance, what is seen on TV is a heavily marketed, commercialized version of holiday food. I come from the southeastern US. People there often eat very much like what MW describes above, but what is traditional may differ greatly. I tend to think heritage foods are actually traditional and the rest is just marketing that seems to have stuck with us through corporate marketing, cheap industrial production, media, and convenience. However, if it is something one does all the time, then it becomes tradition. For instance, I have a very good friend who has a family tradition of going to eat at White Castle on Christmas Eve. Tradition really is about what you make it. Heritage foods are a bit different. If you separate the historic connotation from "traditional" it becomes a bit easier to answer your question.

    Apples - what many of us see in our grocery stores bear poor resemblance to what constitutes good or even great apples. They were selected for appearance, storage, and shipping. Find apple growers near you to get a better idea of what good apples are. The difference is night and day. In fact, most fruits follow this pattern.

    Tomatoes - if there is ever a more appropriate food on which to make a distinction, I don't know it. Heirloom varieties I view as traditional. However, good luck getting decent tomatoes at a grocery store...where most of us choose to buy.

    A good many foods are no longer represented in the market. Quince and Medlars are fantastic when used appropriately but good luck finding them unless you know growers. Heritage foods abound and there are groups like Slow Foods and others who are trying to bring us back to eating heritage foods that actually taste good.

    To many people, a butterball turkey (or similar commercial offering) is traditional, but they've only been around since 1954. You can find heritage turkeys, but it will take a little effort and extra cost. You can also go with wild turkey which are still eaten extensively in many areas.

    Cranberry goo in a can has only been around since 1912. Many people consider stovetop stuff traditional since that is all they have ever had...so in a sense I guess it is.

    Venison, pork products (fall was always hog-killing time), etc were traditional in my family. If you live on the coast, there is certainly a fish, crab, scallops component. In the deep south you can add crayfish to the mix.

    As for side dishes, in the southeast you find squash/pumpkin dishes, baked cheese grits, hominy, green beans with potatoes, apple pies (some with cheddar cheese baked on top), mashed potatoes, stuffings or dressings, sausages, etc...but you asked for sweets so I'll try to stick to sweets:

    seasonal produce dishes abound -

    apples used extensively in everything from pies to stuffings and cider (some of which is alcoholic),
    pears as with apples...except that the alcoholic drink is caled perry
    persimmons (over about 1/2 of the US),
    pawpaws (in about 24 states),
    sweet potato dishes (made into both savory and sweet dishes)
    pumpkins and other winter squashes (made into both savory and sweet dishes)
    cookies, cakes, and pies of numerous types
    spiced pecans (I make maple syrup/cinnamon)

    in fact, pecans, walnuts, hazel (filberts), hickory, beech, heartnuts, butternuts, and a good variety of other nut species are used extensively with many of the above in addition to all manner of pies, spiced nuts, ground into flour for cookies and cakes, etc...

    cheescakes (especially plain or those related with seasonal fruits,

    all manner of chocolate confections... we tend to go a bit nuts with chocolate!

    spiced hot apple cider

    I'll have to talk to folks but that is all I can recall at the moment.

    BTW, can I take from your note that you're looking for recipes?
    persimmonpudding.com: dedicated to growing, education, and use of Diospyros virginiana L., the common, or American persimmon...and persimmon pudding is ALWAYS a holiday favorite!!!

  6. #6

  7. #7

    Coconut Pudding - Chinese

    Coconut Pudding( Chinese ) :

    This is one of the Chinese nutritious food

    Ingredients for chinese coconut pudding:

    * 2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
    * 1 3/8 cups boiling water
    * 1 (5 ounce) can evaporated milk
    * 1 cup white sugar
    * 1 teaspoon coconut extract
    * 2 egg whites
    * add to recipe box Add to Recipe Box

    method of preparation:

    1. Lightly grease a 1-quart mold.
    2. In a large bowl, dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Stir in evaporated milk, sugar and coconut extract. Allow to cool to room temperature.
    3. Meanwhile, whip egg whites until fluffy. When gelatin mixture has cooled to room temperature, place gelatin bowl in an ice bath. When mixture begins to set, fold egg whites into it. Spread in prepared mold and refrigerate until set.


    Happy christmas
    Ainsley

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